Traditional vs Self Publishing: Which path for your book?

It’s hard to believe the summer is half over and I haven’t even taken a vacation yet. Have you? I hope so.

Well for those of you still hanging around, I thought this month I’d discuss the difference between traditional publishing and self-publishing. When a prospective author comes to me and wants to write a book, I ask them right away whether they plan on seeking a publisher or publishing themselves. Some are pretty clear while others don’t have a clue which path they want to pursue.

Those who are sure they want to find an agent or publisher to publish their book will take a different path from those who are clear that they will self publish their book. For those of you who aren’t sure, let me explain some of the pros and cons of each path.

This week I’ll focus on traditional publishing and next week self-publishing. With the ease and popularity of self-publishing and more recently e-publishing, it seems traditional publishing’s days are numbered. Over the years, the number of traditional New York publishers has dwindled, and of those left many have merged. Additionally, mid-size and small publishers have sprouted as digital publishing has made book printing more accessible to those who want to start a small press.

In case you’re not familiar with them, your traditional publishers are Little Brown, Random House, Simon & Schuster, Harper, Hay House, Wiley, and a few more. Look on your bookshelves at your hard cover books and you’ll find the traditional publishers.

Let’s look at why someone would choose traditional over self publishing: wants someone else to handle printing, distribution, and sales; wants the prestige of having a large publisher; wants a literary agent to handle writing career; wants publisher to arrange promotion; has a platform and wants to expand a brand; wants the support of an in-house editor. If you have any of these desires, you might choose this path.

Now, here are some of the benefits and drawbacks to traditional publishing: publisher pays all production costs, does initial promotion (in most cases), distributes books, has sales team; however, it can take years (or never) to find an agent or publisher, you’re expected to have an established following (platform), you only get a small percentage royalty, you have minimal control over cover and content, you’ll wind up doing the bulk of promotion.

If you’re still not sure which path is right for you, stay tuned to my next installment on self publishing.

Happy writing,

Andrea

Andrea Susan Glass
www.WritersWay.com


 

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Connect With Us

Facebook Pinterest Google Plus
YouTube LinkedIn Twitter

 If you want to receive the latest updates to my blog, tap this button to subscribe
 Listen to My Latest Interview
Listen to internet radio with Flora M Brown PhD on Blog Talk Radio
 Join my network:
 Recent Posts
 Recent Comments
 Categories
 Archives
 Amazon.com
 Check Out These Great Business Tools!
Business Blogs - Blog Top Sites
Business Blogs - BlogCatalog Blog Directory
WritersWay Blog - Blogged
Business

If you like my blogs you can make comments and vote for my blog by clicking on the blogtoplist.com link.
 Tags