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Writing as a Labor of Love
(This Post was posted on Wednesday, February 23rd, 2011 at 5:35 pm)

For some people, writing is worse than getting their teeth drilled. I once read, “It’s more fun to have written than to write”. I can attest to that, especially when I sit down to write 4 emails, 12 blog posts, and 3 articles at one sitting. And then add to that a bunch of Facebook notes and various comments on friends’ notes and blogs.

Also, I’ve alluded to the fact that I often have difficulty writing from my heart, so I’ve been practicing more with these blog posts and emails. But whether you’re writing a blog post, article, email, Facebook note, or an ebook, writing from the heart is the key that connects you with your audience. They hear what you’re saying, but also feel your intent behind the words—your intent to provide value.

When you write from your heart, you connect with your target audience, and when you write with a purpose your writing is at its most impactful! You’re writing what you most want to convey, and you’re writing what you feel others will benefit from

Therefore, writing for both yourself and others is the key to effective communication. And when you’re writing from the heart, it can be a labor of love!

Happy writing!

Andrea Susan Glass

Write a Love Letter to Yourself
(This Post was posted on Sunday, February 13th, 2011 at 10:47 pm)

Valentine’s Day is upon us and I’m sure everybody is writing about it. Well, what else is there to write about when you start to run out of ideas? The holidays, your family problems, your health issues—honestly I see people writing about their very personal stuff in blogs, emails, etc. I’m sorry, but I really don’t think my readers want to know about all my little bitty personal stuff.

I like to write about writing. I like to talk about what’s current. So what are you doing for Valentine’s Day? Do you have someone to show how much you love them? We all do, and we all especially have ourselves to show our love. (Well my cat too!) Did you ever write yourself a love letter? I have, and it’s really amazing to write it. And then when you read it back, it’s awesome. It’s like the truest love there is—the love you have for yourself.

Okay, you think I’m off my rocker. Or not! So many people fail to realize that self love is the basis for any love. If I don’t love me, I can’t love you. Because I don’t know what love really is. And I don’t have a loving self to present to you.

So why not write a love letter to yourself this Valentine’s Day. If it’s hard, pretend it’s from your spouse, lover, or future lover. What would you want him/her to say to you? Then say it to yourself.

And when you’re done with your love letter to you, write one to your beloved—spouse, parent, child, pet… You know who they are.

Happy writing and Happy Valentine’s Day!


Andrea Susan Glass

Old Fashioned Love Letters
(This Post was posted on Friday, February 11th, 2011 at 8:53 pm)

Ah, we’re still not at Valentine’s Day yet, but creeping ever closer. I wonder if today anyone writes love letters to their beloved on Valentine’s Day. I wonder if the art of writing love letters, love notes, or even love poems has morphed into love emails and even love texts! We’ve come a long way baby—at least technology wise.

But I’m old fashioned—and fairly old at that—and I still like the longer ways of writing. I still have friends I write LETTERS to, yes, that’s right—LETTERS! And I still write in my journal from time to time. I even send thank you cards, birthday cards, and greeting cards by snail mail!!

What I think is even cooler, is my good friend Lynette Smith of who embraced the whole idea of writing treasured letters to loved one. How cool is that? It all started when her son got married and wrote her and her husband a letter of thanks for raising him to be the man he is today. Lynette got to thinking about the Lost Art of writing letters and set about to change that.

So she created booklets that would teach people how to write treasured letters to loved ones. Her first 4 booklets are wedding themed: writing to your husband, wife, parents, and children when they marry.

I was her first customer as my brother was just getting married to his second wife. I’m not sure if they even read the booklets, but I think they’re brilliant. First of all, when you write a love letter, your note will stand out from the barrage of emails, texts, or whatever way you usually communicate and your receiver usually gets communications. Second, you can take your time when you write a love letter, rather than rushing through a quick email or even quicker text.

So take a look at and think about who in your life would be thrilled to know how much you care for them. What a great Valentine’s Day gift—an old fashioned love letter.

Happy writing!


Andrea Susan Glass

Writing for a purpose—with your heart!
(This Post was posted on Wednesday, February 9th, 2011 at 8:37 pm)

I love the idea of theme of the month, because when you write as much as I do, the theme gives me a place to start and helps reduce writers’ block! And I also like talking about writing with a purpose, because it helps me focus on what to write about.

So back to the theme of the month: Writing from the heart. I feel that when you write from your heart, you’re writing with a purpose; but is it your purpose or your readers’ purpose? And are they two different things? I think they are.

As I’m sure you’re aware, everything you write has a purpose. If you write an email to your mailing list, your purpose is to stay in touch with your audience, letting them know what you’re up to, and providing valuable ideas. So YOUR purpose is to stay in touch, and the purpose for your READERS is to keep them informed.

Now, if you write an article to submit to article directories, your purpose is to spread your expertise over the web so people will contact you to find out more about your services and/or products. Therefore, YOUR purpose is exposure and to attract business, and your READERS’ purpose is to gain valuable information.

And when you write an ebook, your purpose is most often to educate readers in your area of expertise, as well as to make a profit. So YOUR purpose is to make a profit, and the purpose for your READERS is to gain information for education or to solve a problem.

The clearer you are about the purpose of your writing, the more effective you’ll be at reaching that purpose—both for yourself and your readers! When you connect with your purpose, you’ll connect with your readers. They’ll get what you’re communicating and respond accordingly.

My purpose in writing blogs is to share my knowledge in the area of writing books and ebooks so my readers will accomplish their purpose of writing their book or ebook. Please send me comments to let me know if these blogs are helpful.

It’s my purpose to help you achieve your purpose. Connect with your purpose and you connect with your readers

Happy Writing!


Andrea Susan Glass

I Have Too Much To Write About
(This Post was posted on Friday, January 28th, 2011 at 8:48 pm)

Okay, some of you do have this problem—TMI—too much information. And it’s no surprise as we’re living in the Information Age. It comes at us 24/7 from all directions—and it’s awfully difficult to shut it down. At least we have to become discerning, as we just can’t take it all in.

So, sometimes one or more of my book clients will tell me the problem in getting their book written is too much content. Maybe they’ve been amassing ideas for years, waiting for that day when they’d find the time to write that elusive book. Or maybe they’re a research nut, like me, and they have all their stock in Google, because where would we be without it?

I do my best to help aspiring authors to overcome the “too much to write about” syndrome in several ways. I start with my 20 questions that helps to clarify what the book is about, the goals for the author and reader, and other specific details. Then we formulate the table of contents. They we decide about how long we want the book or ebook to be.

Then we look at where all the content is coming from. If it looks like there’s just too much information, I suggest that we may have more than one book here. Hey, a series is not a bad idea: just look at Chicken Soup and For Dummies.  At this point we may plan out a series of books.

Additionally, this extra information can be used in articles, blog posts, workbooks, and other information products that can accompany the book or ebook.

But, if you’re still stuck with the TMI or “too much to write about” syndrome, I’ve been known to schedule a conference with the client and make the decisions for them. Well, someone has to move the project along, and that might be me.

Call me, if you do get stuck in this situation. I’m here to help.

Happy Writing!


Andrea Susan Glass

I Don’t Have Enough To Write About
(This Post was posted on Wednesday, January 26th, 2011 at 8:44 pm)

When you’re just starting to think about writing a book, you may be one of those who fall into the category o thinking you don’t have enough to write about. After all a book should be at least 150 to 200 pages or more and you can’t think of that much to say.

First of all, there are all sizes of books from 25 page picture and quote books to 1,000 page tomes. Nowadays, almost anything goes! And with ebooks, the whole world of writing has taken a 180 degree turn. I’ve paid upwards of $50 for a 35-page ebook, thinking I was getting the brilliant answers to life’s tough questions. So no matter the size of the book, it’s the sizzle that sells.

Second, if you have an interest, a passion, or an expertise in the subject you want to write about, I’ll bet you have more than enough to write about. You can go really niche and write about a very specific topic like teaching your parakeet to recite the alphabet or you can go broad on a topic like teaching any bird to talk. It all depends on what the market is asking for and how much information is available on the subject.

What you don’t know, you can either research or take in a partner or two; that is, get a collaborator or conduct a few interviews to get more content for your book. And we all know the success story of the Chicken Soup model of having other people write your book for you!

So, please don’t use the “I don’t have enough to write about” excuse any longer. Remember, it’s sizzle over size, every time.

Happy Writing!


Andrea Susan Glass

Should I Write A Book Or Ebook Or Both?
(This Post was posted on Monday, January 24th, 2011 at 7:55 am)

When I start working with a client who wants to write a book, we generally start off with the idea of writing a book rather than an ebook. For years, that’s been the norm; you want to write a book, you write a paperback or hard cover book.

Well, it’s not the norm any more. Since sales of ebooks have overtaken hard copy books at Amazon, I have suggested we rethink our strategy. And here’s the reason: it costs nothing to produce an ebook in terms of production and distribution costs. The only costs you may have, which you’d also have for a hard copy book, would be for the services of someone like me if you used a ghostwriter or copyeditor, someone to design the interior and cover for your book, and someone to upload it to your website and set up your shopping cart. And you may be able to do all that on your own and basically have zero costs to produce an ebook.

With a hard copy book you need to have it professionally formatted and a cover designed, then get it printed, and then have it distributed. The costs on these services varies but it will always cost you more to produce a hard copy book than an ebook.

So what I’ve been doing with most of my clients is producing the ebook first, because it’s a no-brainer. Write and design it in Word, save it as a PDF, upload it to your website—and you’re in business. Then you can send it to Amazon to get into the Kindle program.

I suggest that my clients get some feedback from buyers of their ebook, so if they want to make any additions or corrections, they can do that before they print the book. They can also experiment with some marketing strategies, so when they do print their book and they want to recoup the printing costs, they’ll have some marketing success under their belt.

Make sense? Feel free to share your comments, questions, and experience on this topic.

Happy Writing!


Andrea Susan Glass

How Long Should My Ebook Be?
(This Post was posted on Thursday, January 20th, 2011 at 11:40 pm)

This is one question I get a lot. Is 30 pages long enough for my ebook? Is 100 pages too long for an ebook?

My answer is always: it depends. On what? On what you plan to do with your ebook!

If you’re writing an ebook to give away–as an enticement to have someone join your mailing list, as a bonus when you sell another product or as a bonus to offer someone in a joint venture, or as a sample of your writing or your ideas–then 30 pages is enough. After all, it’s free, and you may want the buyers to buy a product or service from you, so you don’t want to give away the store.

Now, if you plan to sell your ebook for $17, $27, or even $47, then you need to give it some meat, and make it worth while. After all, you want to give the appropriate value for the cost and you want buyers to buy from you again, so you don’t want to cheat them.

I’ve seen really short ebooks selling for more than $50, and I’ve seen terribly written and poorly spelled ebooks that the author expects will lead to the next level sale, but this is cheating your audience. First impressions are lasting impressions, so I believe in giving value–all the time, even with your freebies.

It’s a jungle out there, and if you want to build your business and make a name for yourself online, make your ebook long enough to say what you need to say, and give the value to make customers clamor for more.

Let me know if this all makes sense to you!

Happy ebook writing!


Andrea Susan Glass

What Do You Write When You Don’t Know What to Write?
(This Post was posted on Thursday, January 20th, 2011 at 11:16 pm)

I wouldn’t exactly call it writer’s block, more like writer’s running out of ideas. At least that’s what I run into when I set out to write 3 blog posts per week, 1article per week, 4 emails per month, and countless posts on Facebook, LinkedIn, Twitter, and who knows where else? Oh, and not to mention answering about 20-30 emails per day!!!

I’m exhausted just thinking of all the brain power it takes to write all that. And I’m a writer. Imagine if writing is not your thing and you have all this writing to do.

One trick I learned way back in a writing class I took is that when you don’t know what to write, just write about that–not knowing what to write. And in doing so, you open the floodgates of your communication and just keep writing about something, anything, or nothing at all.

After all, Jerry Seinfeld made a fortune on a TV show about nothing. So write about nothing, and see if something comes of it.

Happy Writing,


Andrea Susan Glass

For Technorati – claim your blog!
(This Post was posted on Wednesday, February 11th, 2009 at 6:30 am)



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