Category : social networking
Book Marketing & Promotion: Online vs Offline
(This Post was posted on Tuesday, September 27th, 2011 at 9:54 pm)

Ta dah! The moment you’ve all been waiting for. I’m now going to reveal some of the top book marketing strategies.

Most of these you can use online and off:

1. Advertising: online with Google Adwords, offline in industry magazines

2. Affiliates: have other people sell your books

3. Blogs: have valuable content on your blog and as a guest blogger

4. Joint ventures: have others promote to their list

5. Mailings: online with email to your list and other lists; offline with direct mail

6. Media: radio shows online and off

7. Social marketing: online with Facebook, LinkedIn and other social sites, offline by building relationships and strategic alliances

8. Speaking: online teleclasses and webinars (yours and others), offline giving talks and seminars

9. Writing: articles, blogs, columns, press releases, ezines, newsletters, websites—the sky’s the limit both online and off

Now I’m sure you can find something on this list that works best for your book, your market, and you. If you’re still stumped brainstorm some ideas with whomever you’ve selected as your support person (me included!) and start putting together your marketing plan.

I suggest you sign up for book marketing newsletters, such as John Kremer and Penny Sansevieri, since new and improved promotional ideas are always being “discovered” or “invented” or “re-invented” and you want to stay on top of these developments in this rapidly changing world of book and ebook marketing. And with the new ebook readers, a whole new world of book marketing is upon us, so keep your eyes, ears, and fingers open!

As you experience success, please share it with me and my readers by posting a comment on this blog. Let’s all learn from each other.

Happy writing, (& promoting!)

Andrea Susan Glass

P.S. My new 6-week course “Write an Ebook: Hands-on Class” will begin on Tuesday, October 4 from  6:30 to 9:00 pm at the Cal State San Marcos University campus, 333 S. Twin Oaks Valley Road. If you live in the San Diego area or know someone who does, please let them know about this ground-breaking class. My goal is to have students finish an ebook in 6 weeks. For more information visit and click on Extended Learning or call 760-750-4020.

Book Marketing & Promotion: Do what you do best
(This Post was posted on Wednesday, September 21st, 2011 at 9:46 pm)

How are you feeling now about marketing your book? A little more comfortable? It’s about to get even more comfortable!

I’m not one of those people who suggest you do something because you “have” to or because it’s the “only way” to get results. I truly believe that if you do something when your heart and mind aren’t into it, your chances for success diminish. Therefore, when I asked my 93-year-old client if he would like me to help him get some opportunities to speak to promote his book, and he said, “I don’t do speaking,” so I didn’t push it. I’ll focus on what he “will” do and we’ll go from there.

So what do you enjoy doing, love to do, feel comfortable doing? How do you like to interact with your readers? How would you like to connect with your readers? You have many choices here, so the goal is to make it fun and easy.

What do you do best: write, talk, teach, listen, act, design, sell…? If you like to write (and I hope you do after just completing your book), there are many opportunities to write to attract your market from articles and blogs to press releases, websites, and direct mail. If you enjoy teaching you can do live seminars and classes as well as online teleclasses and webinars.

Find your best skill and comfort level and choose your strategy to promote your book to your ideal reader. I’ll lay out many of the online and offline strategies in the next installment.

Happy writing (& promoting),

Andrea Susan Glass

PS. I’m happy to offer my 20-minute complimentary consultation where I can help you pinpoint your best marketing strategy for your book. Contact me at

Book Marketing & Promotion: Where are your readers?
(This Post was posted on Tuesday, September 13th, 2011 at 9:37 pm)

Welcome back to the next installment of the “dreaded” book marketing primer. My goal is to make book marketing fun and easy, because I know how much you love the book you just poured your heart and soul into and how much you want to get it into the hands of your readers!

And that’s where the fun is: connecting with your ideal readers. Who did you write your book or ebook for? What aim did you have for your readers? What did you want them to gain from reading your book? What will compel them to say, “I have to have this book”?

These are the questions you asked when you started writing your book and these questions should be answered now that you’ve finished the book. So say your book is about life balance for working moms and your book shows this audience how to take care of themselves while also caring for their children, spouse, their home, and their work! Whew! Sounds like a great book that every working mom could use and would love to have.

So you know your ideal reader, now you just have to find them. Well, lucky you. This happens to be a clearly identifiable market. They’re everywhere. Working moms have websites, meetups, organizations, magazines, and conferences. And the subcategory of “work at home moms” is a growing segment of the marketplace, also easy to identify and locate. Use your handy search engine to do a search for this market and build a list of where you can find them. Also ask around to people in your personal and professional circles if they know anyone influential in this group or of organizations in this market.

Take the same steps for your market—whether they are sports nuts, animal lovers, college professors, retirees—whomever you’ve identified as your ideal reader.

As to how you will connect with these readers, we’ll base that on your book, your abilities, your preferences, your budget, and several other factors.

Stay tuned…

Happy writing (& marketing),

Andrea Susan Glass

PS. If you live in San Diego you might want to check out the 21st Century Book Marketing Seminar. ( It’s October 14-16. You’ll learn just about all you need to know about marketing your book!

Book Marketing & Promotion: Make a Plan
(This Post was posted on Tuesday, September 6th, 2011 at 9:36 pm)

If you’ve been reading my emails for a while you’ll see that I’ve been following a sequence throughout this year of priming you to write your book by offering good solid content. I’ve led you through the basics and discussed many of the steps that go into writing a book or ebook.

And now we come to what many authors dread: I have to sell those precious books. For many of us writing is the most satisfying part of the process—we expressed our thoughts, shared our expertise, and fulfilled a goal. But writing is the furthest activity from marketing! So this month, I’m tackling “book marketing made fun and easy!” (Marketing and promotion are so similar, I use them here interchangeably).

This week I want to talk about a marketing plan. Because promoting your book may feel foreign and overwhelming, it helps to have a strategy. Here are some of the steps you might want to include in your plan:

1. Get support in your marketing efforts (a mentor, coach, PR expert, VA, partner…)

2. Locate your ideal readers (you identified who they are before you wrote the book)

3. Decide where you will market based on where your readers are

4. Plan online and offline activities

5. Schedule at least one marketing/promotional task per week

6. Track your results

This should get you started. From my experience and education in book marketing, I’ve found that each book has a path of its own. While one book can catapult to the bestseller lists through blogging, another book might build its success through media interviews.

The path you take to success will be based on the nature of your book, your ideal readers, and you! The clearer you are on these, the easier it will be to find the best marketing plan for your book. I’ll go into more detail in the next emails.

Learn as you go and keep doing what works best for you.

Happy writing (& promoting),


PS. A quick reminder, if you live in the San Diego area or know someone who does, I’ll be teaching a 5-week course “Writing Nonfiction” starting Monday, September 12 at MiraCosta College ( and I’ll be giving a talk “All About Ebooks” on Tuesday, September 13 at San Marcos Library ( to introduce my 6-week class “Write an Ebook” starting Tuesday, October 4 at Cal State San Marcos (

Staying on target; staying the course
(This Post was posted on Tuesday, May 24th, 2011 at 6:58 pm)

Let’s say at this point you’re well into writing your book or ebook. You’ve established a sort of rhythm. You get up at 5 am and write until 8 am. You do this five mornings/week. (Or you’re a night owl and write from 10 pm to 1 am)

At this rate you’re putting in around 15 hours/week, which at an average of one hour/page is 15 pages or a typical chapter. If your book has 10 chapters, you’ll be finished writing in 10 weeks. Not too bad!

But what happens when those 15 hours don’t happen? What gets in the way? Lots of things, like…

* Emergencies, both personal and business: a family crisis, or that last minute contract

* Distractions and interruptions: the dog barking outside your office, the phone ringing endlessly

* Unforeseen circumstances: your computer crashes, you run out of paper or ink

* Challenges: writers’ block, you’re stuck, your mind keeps wandering

* Personal issues: your back hurts, your best friend needs your support

* Temptations: you’re invited to a playoff, there’s a party at the office

Okay, I’m sure you know what I’m talking about here. We all get sidetracked, off target, even me. So what are some tips, tricks, tools, & techniques to stay the course and circumvent these inevitable disruptions of your routine?

First, get back in touch with your motivation. Imagine your name on the cover of your book or ebook. I often have clients design a temporary book cover, just to get that image in their mind. Now imagine a long line of people waiting to get a signed copy of your book. Get excited, get into all the feelings of meeting your goal and giving readers an exceptional book that could change their lives.

Second, get support or accountability. I have several accountability partners who hold me to my commitments. I’m happy to serve in this capacity for you as well. Check out my accountability coaching services at

Third, tell everyone that you’re writing a book and are not to be disturbed during your writing time. Then make that commitment to yourself that you won’t vary your routine (well if you want to add an extra hour or write a little later or earlier, that’s fine). Being accountable to ourselves seems to be more difficult than to others, but it’s worth it.

And lastly, keep your eye on the goal, the finished product, that extraordinary book or ebook with your name on the cover and your invaluable wisdom between the covers. What a remarkable accomplishment! You can do it!

Happy Writing!


PS. Happy Memorial Day! With some extra time off from work, this is the perfect opportunity to log in some extra writing hours.

Writing Compelling Marketing Copy for your Business
(This Post was posted on Monday, August 9th, 2010 at 6:38 pm)

As a service professional, such as a coach, consultant, or health care provider, your goals are twofold: to help as many people as possible and to make a profit in your business. In order to achieve these goals, you need to let as many people as possible know about your services and convert as many as possible into paying clients!

However, this often presents a challenge. Why? Because you’re highly skilled at the service you provide, but probably not as skilled at marketing and selling those services. When you trained in your industry, it’s unlikely you took any classes in sales and marketing, and if you did, a lot of it probably went over your head.

That is, until you hung out your shingle and got out there in the world to open your doors to business. And found out getting the clients in the door to offer your services was a little tricky. You may have applied some of what you learned or had to learn on the fly. You may have discovered what didn’t work and maybe some of what did work. You can continue to throw tofu against the wall and see what sticks or you can get a plan!

One piece of advice I give to my marketing students at UCSD is that to be effective more times than not, it pays to have a marketing strategy or plan. And when they focus on their target market and the best methods to reach them, they find that most of the strategies require writing marketing copy—another skill usually not taught when you learned the skill you provide in your services.

Once you’ve clarified your ideal clients—by gender, age, income bracket, location, problem, and whatever else identifies them—you get a clearer picture of how to reach them. And in order to reach them effectively to generate leads and convert them to clients, you have to have a clear message about what you do. Your message must be written in compelling copy to capture readers’ attention and propel them to say YES!

Now you may be doing most of your marketing online; you may be doing some of it offline; or you may be doing a combination. This depends on how you serve the client and if online methods make sense. Even if you’re a hands-on healer who needs to treat clients locally, you can still use online methods to let people know about your services.
If you use online methods, you might have a website or blog, write articles and press releases, and use social media like Facebook and LinkedIn. If you use offline methods, you may use direct mail newsletters, and postcards, attend networking events, or give talks and workshops. Yet, what all these methods have in common is that you need to write compelling marketing copy.

There are 5 common factors you need to have in every piece of marketing copy:
1.    speak to your target market
2.    identify problems and solutions
3.    clarify your differentiation/niche
4.    use keywords
5.    include a call to action and contact information

For example, if you have a website, you need to have your message about who you serve and what problem you solve immediately available to visitors to your site. You need to tell visitors what to do—sign up for your newsletter or call you for a complimentary consultation. Or if you’re sending out a flyer for a workshop, you need to have a great workshop title that taps into your market’s primary problem, have a bulleted list of benefits they will get by attending, and tell them to send you a check for the workshop fee by a certain date because you can only take a limited number of students.

All these components make for compelling marketing copy that will attract a lot of leads for you that you can convert into paying clients. When you learn some of these skills, you’ll be able to achieve your goals of helping as many people as possible and making a profit in your business—a win for everyone!

Happy Info-Product Profits,


Andrea Susan Glass